Kanchanaburi

Kanchanaburi (Thai: กาญจนบุรี) is a city at the confluence of the Rivers Kwai Noi and Kwai Yai.

Train crossing the Bridge over the River Kwai

. . . Kanchanaburi . . .

For most visitors the main sight of interest is the Bridge over the River Kwai, as the start of the infamous World War II Death Railway to Burma (now Myanmar), as well as the many associated museums. There is an increasingly thriving backpacker scene taking advantage of the chilled-out riverside vibe for those who want to get away from Bangkok. Kanchanaburi is also the gateway to the surrounding province of the same name. More foreign visitors are discovering why Thais know it as one of the most beautiful provinces in the country with its easily accessible waterfalls and national parks.

Orienting yourself in Kanchanaburi is very easy. The main road, Saeng Chuto Road, runs the length of town from north to south, connecting the River Kwai Bridge, the train station, and the bus station. Running parallel to this, closer to the river, is Mae Nam Kwae Road where most of the guest houses and the local bar scene can be found.

  • Tourist Authority of Thailand, Saeng Chuto Rd (Just south of the bus terminal). 08:00-16:00 daily. Distributes a useful free map of the city and province. 

BKS public buses (line 81) leave from Bangkok‘s Southern Bus Terminal (Sai Tai Taling Chan สายใต้ตลิ่งชัน), which is far west in the suburb of Thonburi. In Kanchanaburi, there are two separate but nearby bus terminals, with 1st class buses departing from an office off Saengchuto Rd, and 2nd class buses from the larger terminal one block east.

  • 1st class buses leave Bangkok every 15 minutes from 05:00-22:30, take about 2 hours, and cost 110 baht, including a bottle of water.
  • 2nd class buses (new route) leave Bangkok every 20 minutes from 03:30-19:00 and take about 2 hours. Cost 110 baht. (They now claim that there is no 2nd class bus going to Kanchanaburi, yet there is, but they charge the same price as for the 1st class bus.
  • 2nd class buses (old route) leave Bangkok every 15-30 minutes from 04:00-18:00 and take about 3 hours.

There are also tourist minibuses directly to/from Khao San Road, departing Kanchanaburi at 13:30 and 18:30.

There are also some buses leaving less frequently from Bangkok’s Northern Mo Chit bus terminal (note: not the same as Mo Chit BTS station, and not within walking distance of it, although a standard 50 baht motorbike taxi ride is available. It’s called “Mo Chit 2”). Here are the times (approximate):

First-class bus with toilet (3 hours, 122 baht): 06:00, 11:00, 14:30.

Second-class bus with no toilet inside (not sure about time and price, times are probably the same): 05:00, 07:00, 09:30, 12:30, 17:00.

Bus rides may be variable or cancelled (for example, with 14:30 being last of the day.) But there are vans available at the bus station leaving even when you’re told there’s no way to get there by bus! It may pay to talk to the information desk about this. Price is around 120 baht, about 2 hr.

From Nakhon Pathom, there are direct buses (2nd class only) every 15 to 30 minutes between 04:00 and 18:00, which take two hours. Alternatively, you can hop off a 1st class bus when it passes by Nakhon Pathom, but double-check with staff to ensure the route allows this and they know your plans.

From Sangkhlaburi to Kanchanaburi, you’re spoilt for choice:

  • Air-con VIP buses leave at 08:45, 10:45, and 14:30 and take 4 hours.
  • Air-con minibuses leave at 06:30, 07:30, 11:30, 13:00, 15:30 and take 3.5 hours.
  • Standard buses leave at 06:45, 08:15, 10:15, 13:15 and take 5 hours.

. . . Kanchanaburi . . .

This article is issued from web site Wikivoyage. The original article may be a bit shortened or modified. Some links may have been modified. The text is licensed under “Creative Commons – Attribution – Sharealike” [1] and some of the text can also be licensed under the terms of the “GNU Free Documentation License” [2]. Additional terms may apply for the media files. By using this site, you agree to our Legal pages . Web links: [1] [2]

. . . Kanchanaburi . . .

Previous post Jonathan Wilker
Next post Great Britain at the 1924 Summer Olympics